Pilomatrix carcinoma presenting as an extra axial mass: clinicopathological features.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/107081
Title:
Pilomatrix carcinoma presenting as an extra axial mass: clinicopathological features.
Authors:
Aherne, Noel J; Fitzpatrick, David A; Gibbons, David; Armstrong, John G
Affiliation:
Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. naherne@gmail.com
Citation:
Pilomatrix carcinoma presenting as an extra axial mass: clinicopathological features. 2008, 3:47 Diagn Pathol
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
Diagnostic pathology
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/107081
DOI:
10.1186/1746-1596-3-47
PubMed ID:
19040752
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2633279/?tool=pubmed
Abstract:
Pilomatrix carcinoma is the rare malignant counterpart of pilomatrixoma, a skin adnexal tumour originating from hair matrix cells. Pilomatrix carcinoma can arise as a solitary lesion de novo, or through transformation of a pilomatrixoma. Pilomatrixoma was first described erroneously as being of sebaceous gland origin but was later discovered to be derived from hair matrix cells. They are rare, slow growing tumours of the skin found in the lower dermis and subcutaneous fat and are predominantly found in the neck and the scalp. While known to be locally aggressive, no malignant form was thought to exist until it was described relatively recently. Since then, approximately ninety cases of pilomatrix carcinoma have been reported.We report the case of a 41 year old mentally retarded male who had a longstanding lesion in the left neck for approximately fifteen years previously diagnosed as a pilomatrixoma. He presented with severe headache, falls and visual disturbance and a biopsy showed pilomatrix carcinoma of the occipital region which, on computed tomography ( CT ) invaded the occipital bone, the cerebellum and the left temporal lobe. At his initial presentation he had a craniotomy and subtotal excision of the lesion but received no adjuvant therapy. After an early intracranial recurrence he had further debulking and adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. He has had no further intracranial recurrence after three and a half years of follow-up. Here we present the pathological features of this uncommon tumour.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Pilomatrix carcinoma is the rare malignant counterpart of pilomatrixoma, a skin adnexal tumour originating from hair matrix cells. Pilomatrix carcinoma can arise as a solitary lesion de novo, or through transformation of a pilomatrixoma. Pilomatrixoma was first described erroneously as being of sebaceous gland origin but was later discovered to be derived from hair matrix cells. They are rare, slow growing tumours of the skin found in the lower dermis and subcutaneous fat and are predominantly found in the neck and the scalp. While known to be locally aggressive, no malignant form was thought to exist until it was described relatively recently. Since then, approximately ninety cases of pilomatrix carcinoma have been reported.We report the case of a 41 year old mentally retarded male who had a longstanding lesion in the left neck for approximately fifteen years previously diagnosed as a pilomatrixoma. He presented with severe headache, falls and visual disturbance and a biopsy showed pilomatrix carcinoma of the occipital region which, on computed tomography ( CT ) invaded the occipital bone, the cerebellum and the left temporal lobe. At his initial presentation he had a craniotomy and subtotal excision of the lesion but received no adjuvant therapy. After an early intracranial recurrence he had further debulking and adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. He has had no further intracranial recurrence after three and a half years of follow-up. Here we present the pathological features of this uncommon tumour.
Series/Report no.:
SKIN CANCER; CANCER
ISSN:
1746-1596

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAherne, Noel Jen
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, David Aen
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, John Gen
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-02T10:00:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-07-02T10:00:57Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationPilomatrix carcinoma presenting as an extra axial mass: clinicopathological features. 2008, 3:47 Diagn Patholen
dc.identifier.issn1746-1596-
dc.identifier.pmid19040752-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1746-1596-3-47-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/107081-
dc.descriptionPilomatrix carcinoma is the rare malignant counterpart of pilomatrixoma, a skin adnexal tumour originating from hair matrix cells. Pilomatrix carcinoma can arise as a solitary lesion de novo, or through transformation of a pilomatrixoma. Pilomatrixoma was first described erroneously as being of sebaceous gland origin but was later discovered to be derived from hair matrix cells. They are rare, slow growing tumours of the skin found in the lower dermis and subcutaneous fat and are predominantly found in the neck and the scalp. While known to be locally aggressive, no malignant form was thought to exist until it was described relatively recently. Since then, approximately ninety cases of pilomatrix carcinoma have been reported.We report the case of a 41 year old mentally retarded male who had a longstanding lesion in the left neck for approximately fifteen years previously diagnosed as a pilomatrixoma. He presented with severe headache, falls and visual disturbance and a biopsy showed pilomatrix carcinoma of the occipital region which, on computed tomography ( CT ) invaded the occipital bone, the cerebellum and the left temporal lobe. At his initial presentation he had a craniotomy and subtotal excision of the lesion but received no adjuvant therapy. After an early intracranial recurrence he had further debulking and adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. He has had no further intracranial recurrence after three and a half years of follow-up. Here we present the pathological features of this uncommon tumour.en
dc.description.abstractPilomatrix carcinoma is the rare malignant counterpart of pilomatrixoma, a skin adnexal tumour originating from hair matrix cells. Pilomatrix carcinoma can arise as a solitary lesion de novo, or through transformation of a pilomatrixoma. Pilomatrixoma was first described erroneously as being of sebaceous gland origin but was later discovered to be derived from hair matrix cells. They are rare, slow growing tumours of the skin found in the lower dermis and subcutaneous fat and are predominantly found in the neck and the scalp. While known to be locally aggressive, no malignant form was thought to exist until it was described relatively recently. Since then, approximately ninety cases of pilomatrix carcinoma have been reported.We report the case of a 41 year old mentally retarded male who had a longstanding lesion in the left neck for approximately fifteen years previously diagnosed as a pilomatrixoma. He presented with severe headache, falls and visual disturbance and a biopsy showed pilomatrix carcinoma of the occipital region which, on computed tomography ( CT ) invaded the occipital bone, the cerebellum and the left temporal lobe. At his initial presentation he had a craniotomy and subtotal excision of the lesion but received no adjuvant therapy. After an early intracranial recurrence he had further debulking and adjuvant external beam radiotherapy. He has had no further intracranial recurrence after three and a half years of follow-up. Here we present the pathological features of this uncommon tumour.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSKIN CANCERen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCANCERen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2633279/?tool=pubmeden
dc.titlePilomatrix carcinoma presenting as an extra axial mass: clinicopathological features.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. naherne@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalDiagnostic pathologyen
dc.description.provinceLeinster-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.