Poverty and the life cycle in 20th century Ireland: changing experiences of childhood, education and the transition to adulthood

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/106918
Title:
Poverty and the life cycle in 20th century Ireland: changing experiences of childhood, education and the transition to adulthood
Authors:
Gray, Jane
Affiliation:
Combat Poverty Agency (CPA)
Publisher:
Combat Poverty Agency (CPA)
Issue Date:
May-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/106918
Item Type:
Working Paper
Language:
en
Description:
This study adds to the evidence base on poverty and the life cycle from a childhood centred perspective through a qualitative analysis of a major new database of life history interviews linked to a panel survey. The analysis focused on three birth cohorts of respondents whose households experienced difficulty making ends meet when they were growing up during the 1930s, 1950s and 1970s. Experiences of class discrimination in education were most pronounced in the middle cohort who ‘started out’ during a period of transformation in the Irish social structure. For all three cohorts, vulnerability to poverty across the life course was linked to different patterns of ‘poor fit’ between the timing of key transitions in early adulthood and changing socio-economic and policy environments. The analysis demonstrates that a life cycle approach to social policy must be sufficiently flexible to respond to rapidly changing socio-economic conditions. Within the context of a long-term pattern of change in the timing and sequencing of early adult life transitions, fluctuations in the wider social and economic environment have varying consequences for people at different life stages. A life-cycle approach should also continue to recognise the substantial ways in which social class differences, especially those experienced in childhood and ‘starting out,’ frame opportunities and constraints at ‘turning points’ throughout the life course.
Keywords:
POVERTY; CHILD; CHILD POVERTY; SOCIAL POLICY; SOCIOECONOMIC POLICY
Local subject classification:
LIFE CYCLE; TWENTIETH CENTURY
Series/Report no.:
Working Paper Series; 10/04
ISBN:
9780956566027
Sponsors:
Disclaimer: This report was funded by the Combat Poverty Agency under its Poverty Research Initiative. The views, opinions, findings, conclusions and/or recommendations expressed here are strictly those of the author(s). They do not necessarily reflect the views of the Combat Poverty Agency, which takes no responsibility for any errors or omissions in, or for the accuracy of, the information contained in this Working Paper. It is presented to inform and stimulate wider debate among the policy community and among academics and practitioners in the field.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGray, Janeen
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-29T15:08:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-06-29T15:08:16Z-
dc.date.issued2010-05-
dc.identifier.isbn9780956566027-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/106918-
dc.descriptionThis study adds to the evidence base on poverty and the life cycle from a childhood centred perspective through a qualitative analysis of a major new database of life history interviews linked to a panel survey. The analysis focused on three birth cohorts of respondents whose households experienced difficulty making ends meet when they were growing up during the 1930s, 1950s and 1970s. Experiences of class discrimination in education were most pronounced in the middle cohort who ‘started out’ during a period of transformation in the Irish social structure. For all three cohorts, vulnerability to poverty across the life course was linked to different patterns of ‘poor fit’ between the timing of key transitions in early adulthood and changing socio-economic and policy environments. The analysis demonstrates that a life cycle approach to social policy must be sufficiently flexible to respond to rapidly changing socio-economic conditions. Within the context of a long-term pattern of change in the timing and sequencing of early adult life transitions, fluctuations in the wider social and economic environment have varying consequences for people at different life stages. A life-cycle approach should also continue to recognise the substantial ways in which social class differences, especially those experienced in childhood and ‘starting out,’ frame opportunities and constraints at ‘turning points’ throughout the life course.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDisclaimer: This report was funded by the Combat Poverty Agency under its Poverty Research Initiative. The views, opinions, findings, conclusions and/or recommendations expressed here are strictly those of the author(s). They do not necessarily reflect the views of the Combat Poverty Agency, which takes no responsibility for any errors or omissions in, or for the accuracy of, the information contained in this Working Paper. It is presented to inform and stimulate wider debate among the policy community and among academics and practitioners in the field.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCombat Poverty Agency (CPA)en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Paper Seriesen
dc.relation.ispartofseries10/04en
dc.subjectPOVERTYen
dc.subjectCHILDen
dc.subjectCHILD POVERTYen
dc.subjectSOCIAL POLICYen
dc.subjectSOCIOECONOMIC POLICYen
dc.subject.otherLIFE CYCLEen
dc.subject.otherTWENTIETH CENTURYen
dc.titlePoverty and the life cycle in 20th century Ireland: changing experiences of childhood, education and the transition to adulthooden
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentCombat Poverty Agency (CPA)en
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